The time is coming when genome sequencing will be part of routine clinical care, and open access to genetic variant databases is a necessary step in order to accelerate progress towards precision medicine.

We teach our children to share, mainly so they don’t grow up and turn into fat adults that won’t share their pizza with you. Sharing gives a warm, fuzzy feeling that people of all ages should yearn for — it’s so fun and enjoyable, even businesses are getting in on the action.

Tute Genomics, the Provo-based company specializing in bringing genome analysis to the masses that we profiled earlier this year, is feeling the warm fuzzies after granting public access to 8.5 billion annotations of genetic variants through Google Genomics.

WIth the new public information, Google Genomics users will be able to better process and explore genomic data, in turn making genome analysis that much faster. Precision medicine, here we come.

“Next-generation sequencing has become more affordable than ever,” CEO of Tute Genomics Reid Robison said in a press release. “The time is coming when genome sequencing will be part of routine clinical care, and open access to genetic variant databases is a necessary step in order to accelerate progress towards precision medicine.”

Published 3/17/2015