We think people are their most productive and most impactful when they’re in an awesome, beautiful space where they want to work.

To older generations, working the salt mines represented something to avoid at all costs, hard and grueling labor reserved only for those poor souls willing to bask in an endless reservoir of misery. If you had any other options, you took them in a heartbeat and never looked back.

To this generation, working at Salt Mine represents something else entirely, a safe haven for entrepreneurs who need a place to call home. It’s a place that individuals can work together, strengthen ideas, and grow.

This is the hope of Founder/CEO David Edmunds as he prepares tomorrow’s official announcement unveiling Salt Mine’s new coworking space in Salt Lake City, debuting in January 2016.

“When was in the medical device industry, I was doing that for about 10 years, a lot of times I was a lone wolf,” Edmunds said. “I did not have much opportunity to work with teams and collaborate. Through that whole process, I always found myself more productive as part of a team or in a collaborative process. So I have always had that kind of itch.”

If you believe that Utah’s tech and startup scene is flourishing — at Beehive Startups, that’s basically our first commandment — then you also believe that there is a constant need for more co-working spaces. With the amount of early-stage startups popping up throughout the state, simple logic says that these companies need a place to work, interact, and build the foundation of something that can support the transition into a full-fledged business. Mom and Dad’s basement can only shelter you for so long.

Enter Salt Mine’s new entrepreneur space, located 600 yards from Cottonwood Heights and 600 yards from Midvale, that features 19,000 square feet of options a basement could never provide: a cafe to punish brownies and forget about the pressures of civilization; open coworking spaces with whiteboard walls, where you and others can work on business ideas or draw pictures of fire-breathing dragons; labs dedicated strictly to solitude and coding; and 18 different offices offering shelter for those in need of seclusion.

“We think people are their most productive and most impactful when they’re in an awesome, beautiful space where they want to work,” Edmunds said. “Geographically, we can serve Cottonwood Heights, Sandy, Midvale, but then also be a midpoint between Provo/Lehi and downtown SLC.”

Salt Mine will officially unveil their new space tomorrow. To learn more about this and the general vision of Salt Mine, visit their website.

Published 12/14/2015